Manual Lesson Plans The Man Who Mistook His Wife for a Hat and Other Clinical Tales

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Maria Paiz No book is too advanced or inappropriate. Give it a shot! If you don't like it, you can always let it sit on your shelf for a few more years. I would just like to ask how Oliver Sacks put this masterpiece of intriguing, fascinating on the human psychology and neurology? Wynne Lee Best way to find out "how he did it" is to read Sacks' last book, his autobiography "On the Move", which was published April a few months …more Best way to find out "how he did it" is to read Sacks' last book, his autobiography "On the Move", which was published April a few months before his death in August A great man IMO.

The Inner Lives of Disordered Brains

Lists with This Book. Community Reviews. Showing Rating details. More filters. Sort order. Oct 24, Patrick rated it it was amazing Shelves: books-i-would-blurb. It's rare that I read non-fiction. It's just not my bag. That said, this is one of the most fascinating books I've ever read. I'm guessing I've brought it up hundreds of times in conversation.

It's written by a neurologist who works with people who have stranger-than-usual brain issues. And not only are the cases interesting, but the way he writes about the people invovled is really lovely. It's not clinical at all. Not judgemental.

The Man Who Mistook His Wife for a Hat Notes | Lateralization Of Brain Function | Aphasia

It's very It's interesting to see someone It's rare that I read non-fiction. It's interesting to see someone who obviously knows a lot of hard-line science write about these cases in terms that seem to me more suited to someone who would be a philosopher or a spiritualist. Amazing book. Can't recommend it highly enough View all 21 comments. Feb 14, Dru rated it liked it. Dear Dr. Sacks, On page of the paperback edition of your book, the second paragraph begins with the following sentence: "And with this, no feeling that he has lost feeling for the feeling he has lost , no feeling that he has lost the depth, that unfathomable, mysterious, myriad-levelled depth which somehow defines identity or reality.

What is the subject? What is the ve Dear Dr. What is the verb? Why is the word "that" italicized twice? Good God man, what are you trying to tell me? Sincerely, Baffled in Brooklyn Some people may think "well, if I read the whole chapter, I'm sure I could decipher the meaning. I hope you may succeed where I have so miserably failed. This book has many fascinating studies of neurological disorders, and the stories behind the patients are easily understood and, in many cases, enthralling.

However, Dr. Sacks seems to give his readers too much credit when he throws off "hyperagnosia", "Korsokovian", and "meningioma" like he assumes we had read an entire neurology textbook before picking this one up. Also, many of his sentences like the example above include so many digressions and sudden turns that each one could practically be its own M. Night Shaymalan film pitch. All of this might have to do with the fact that it was written in the eighties, when I presume people were smarter. View all 31 comments. Jul 05, Sheffy rated it it was ok.

Despite so many people recommending this book, my high expectations were disappointed. Yes, it's perversely interesting to hear about neurological conundrums that afflict people in peculiar ways, but Sacks isn't a particularly good writer, nor does he have a good grasp on his audience. At times he obliquely refers to medical syndromes or footnotes other neurologists, as if he is writing for a technical physician audience, but on the whole his stories are too simplistic to engage such an audience Despite so many people recommending this book, my high expectations were disappointed.

At times he obliquely refers to medical syndromes or footnotes other neurologists, as if he is writing for a technical physician audience, but on the whole his stories are too simplistic to engage such an audience. He talks about phenomenology, but doesn't satisfactorily discuss mechanistically what is going on in the brain, so what's the point? To quote a friend in college, it's his own "mental masterbation"--he likes to show off how well-read he his, how many bizarre patients have been referred to him or he's God's gift to them and erudite his vocabulary is, but fails to clearly get his points across.

On top of his confusing musings, his reconstructed dialogue is incredible unrealistic, it's clear why doctors need to learn to communicate better. View all 30 comments. When I had come across the title of the book on Goodreads, I had mistakenly assumed to it to be a humour novel. But, when I finally found the book during one of my book hunts, I learnt that it is a non-fiction book where the author, a neurologist as well as a gifted writer, has presented some fascinating case studies about his patients with unique afflictions.

The book has been divided into 4 parts wherein each section contains the case studies pertaining to a particular category of neurological When I had come across the title of the book on Goodreads, I had mistakenly assumed to it to be a humour novel. The book has been divided into 4 parts wherein each section contains the case studies pertaining to a particular category of neurological afflictions. Medical case studies are written in a dry, clinical language where the patient is dehumanized, and reduced to a cursory phrase.

The narratives are often enriched with quotes, theories and experiences of other doctors, some of whom were stalwarts in their fields. There is a reference to Anton Chekhov as well. In some cases the patients would learn to cope, but in others they would not be so lucky. One problem you might encounter while reading the book is that the narrative is full of medical jargon. Thanks to the internet, we can find out the meanings much effortlessly compared to a dictionary, but if you read a real book, like I did and always do, then you need to put in the effort to type the words in your browser a lot of times.

But, you know what, even if you do not check out every single jargon, you can till understand the fact of the matter. I understand that everybody might not like this book. But, if my review has piqued your interest, then I would urge you to at least check out the Goodreads page of the book. I just came across the list of : books everyone should read by Amazon , and guess what! This book is included in the list. View all 32 comments. Dec 30, Paquita Maria Sanchez rated it really liked it Shelves: uk , actuals-n-factuals. This is not only an informative work on neurological disorders, but a humbling meditation on the beauty of imperfection.

Through entering the worlds of a number of "limited" individuals, Sacks reveals the brain's and therefore the individual's remarkable ability to overcompensate for cognitive deficiencies. As a result of these heightened states of perception, the often frightening and infinitely compelling worlds of each individual are manifested in the means with which they organize and enga This is not only an informative work on neurological disorders, but a humbling meditation on the beauty of imperfection.

As a result of these heightened states of perception, the often frightening and infinitely compelling worlds of each individual are manifested in the means with which they organize and engage with the ordinary, whether it be through mathematics, dance, music, or the visual arts. In simply dealing, they manage to transcend. Sacks explores the varying cognitive expressions of his patients without coming across as cold, sterile, or objectifying. Rather, he devotes a chapter to each individual case, creating in the reader a sense that they are engrossed in a series of fictional character studies, rather than a dry psychological manual or the surface-level observations and blind assumptions of a pompous intellectual.

This would be a perfect starting point for anyone interested in learning a bit more about abnormal psychology. View all 6 comments. Shelves: science-med-env , favourites-adult , brain-mental-autism , aa-patty , non-fiction. Oliver Sacks was the much-loved, highly regarded neurologist who opened up the world of the mind and brain not only to doctors but also to the public. This book is a collection of cases of people with various brain anomalies, some caused by accidents or illness and some conditions present at birth.

It is disconcerting today to read some of the accepted references to patients in retardates, defectives, idiots, morons, simpletons. When he tried to put his shoe and sock back on after a medical test, he picked up his foot and asked if that was his shoe. His wife was seated next to him, and he reached across and pulled on her head when looking for his hat. He was almost like a blind man, guessing what and where things were by feel, smell, taste.

Yet he still functioned as a music school teacher and sang or hummed his way through his daily life to keep himself on some sort of track. We know how to pick up our foot and move it forward. She had to concentrate every second on where her body was and what she needed to do or she folded up and collapsed. Sometimes she complains that her portions are too small, but this is because she only eats from the right half of the plate—it does not occur to her that it has a left half as well.

She knows it intellectually, and can understand, and laugh; but it is impossible for her to know it directly. Knowing it intellectually, knowing it inferentially, she has worked out strategies for dealing with her imperception. She cannot look left, directly, she cannot turn left, so what she does is to turn right—and right through a circle. Thus she requested, and was given, a rotating wheelchair. And now if she cannot find something which she knows should be there, she swivels to the right, through a circle, until it comes into view.

If her portions seem too small, she will swivel to the right, keeping her eyes to the right, until the previously missed half now comes into view; she will eat this, or rather half of this, and feel less hungry than before. But if she is still hungry, or if she thinks on the matter, and realizes that she may have perceived only half of the missing half, she will make a second rotation. He says testing measures deficits. Sacks says although our brain is computer-like, it is also personal and involves judging and feeling.

And that still makes sense to him. They drew for him, played games, expressed themselves in their own way, and enjoyed his company. Regarding the people who seem to have unexplained abilities with numbers and calendars but who cannot perform on tests, he understands that they may see the world in numbers as we see it perhaps in pictures or sounds. In , he met a pair of severely impaired young twin men who always sat together giggling and calling out long numbers to teach other.

Sacks started writing down their numbers, checked them, and discovered they were all, without exception, prime numbers like 3 or 5, divisible only by 1 or by themselves, for those of you unfamiliar with primes. But these were several digits long. So he got out his chart, sat with them one day, and then called out a prime number that was one digit longer than theirs.

They were stunned! Sat and thought about it, smiled, and started calling out numbers the same length 7 and 8 digits. They eventually outstripped him 12 digits! They ended up with 20 digits, which he had to assume were also prime. Given the right conditions, many people who were previously cast aside could enjoy life more on their own terms.

The number twins were separated to give them a better chance to live a normal life, which they did to some extent catching public transport, etc. What kind of price is that to pay to meet our standards instead of their own? The net effect was that she started talking—and stopped drawing. Another GR reviewer, Barbara, has done a nice job of summarising some of the cases in her review. View all 27 comments. Feb 22, Simon Clark rated it it was amazing. I've read a lot of popular science books in my time, and in one way or another they have always felt cut from same cloth.

Similar language used, similar structure, drawing on the same inspirations. After a while it almost feels like you are reading the same book over and over again, with only slight variations in content. A blast, in fact. Oliver Sacks has written a book rather unlike anything I've read before, both I've read a lot of popular science books in my time, and in one way or another they have always felt cut from same cloth. Oliver Sacks has written a book rather unlike anything I've read before, both in its content and delivery, but also the way it acts as a meta-commentary on the field of science communication.

The book is a collection of case studies from Sacks' career as a neurologist, each chapter focusing on a particular patient. The stories themselves are fascinating, ranging from the titular man who's vision is so neurologically impaired that he literally mistakes his wife for a hat, to the woman who lost all sense of proprioception - if she did not look at where her body was in space, she had no idea where it was. However the way that Sacks tells these stories was what gripped me. Quite apart from other popular science writers, he draws on a wide range of inspirations from poetry to philosophy to music to medical papers.

The text is sumptuous. One gets the feeling of a writer who has lived a rich life, who has not been confined to one box of academia, and who allows his experiences to wash together in a melange of words on the page. I loved, loved, loved it. You could argue that Sacks actually makes a point about this in the final chapter, a neurological patient who is a brilliant artist but almost completely incapable of interpersonal communication.

Reading this, at the very end of the book, I got the impression that Sacks was holding up the mirror to the way science was written about at the time, and still is to this day. Are you scientists not brilliant at abstract thought, gifted beyond measure in unpicking complex behaviour from a mass of data, yet totally incapable of connecting another human to that process? You spend so much time living in your box, in your world of abstraction, that you lack the necessary experience in being human, exposure to the humanities, to make a genuine connection to other people.

Sacks demonstrates that if you allow the human to take centre stage, pushing the science to a supporting character, then communication, and wonder, will flow. Absolutely recommended. A real must-read. View 1 comment. I picked up this book because I am a fan of Oliver Sacks and his various speaking engagements lectures, public radio interviews, etc While the case studies in and of themselves make for interesting reading, the tone of the writing is fairly "clinical" and Despite the review blurbs stating that these are "personal" and "touchingly human" looks at neurological disorders, I saw only a few glimpses of this warmth an example that sprin I picked up this book because I am a fan of Oliver Sacks and his various speaking engagements lectures, public radio interviews, etc Despite the review blurbs stating that these are "personal" and "touchingly human" looks at neurological disorders, I saw only a few glimpses of this warmth an example that springs to mind is the "Returning To India" story.

I can't really pin down what I didn't like about the book, but reading it, I had the sense I was being whisked in and out of hospital rooms by a busy, clipboard-toting doctor Apr 16, Mona rated it it was amazing Shelves: nonfiction , math-science-health. I first heard about this book when my biology professor mentioned it in class in reference to right-brain and left-brain disorders. Just last year, I had the good fortune to see the author himself - Dr. Sacks - speak at the university in my hometown.

He was a dynamic and entertaining speaker and from then on, I resolved to try out his books. The book is a collection of case studies on Dr. Sacks's patients with neurological disorders. Sac I first heard about this book when my biology professor mentioned it in class in reference to right-brain and left-brain disorders. Sacks divides the book into four parts, each of which deals with "losses" and "excesses of neurological functions, "transports" of hallucinations, visions, and imagination, and "the simple", concerning the mentally or physically challenged, respectively.

In one chapter titled "The Twins", Sacks describes a pair of twins who had the ability to factor large numbers in their heads, so much so that they could calculate the date of any day of the week in history. He discovers that numbers, especially prime numbers were, for them, a special sort of communication that required no thinking through but was instantaneous. In another chapter, Sacks relates how a previously healthy patient woke up one morning convinced that the leg lying in his bed was not his.

Efforts to convince him otherwise including his own efforts to toss it out onto the floor which resulted in the rest of him falling out as well were fruitless. How and why do these pheomena occur?

the man who mistook his wife for a hat part1

These are the questions Sacks attempts to answer. Although Sacks includes discussion of concepts that may be familiar only to psychologists or neurologists, the book is accessible to readers without that type of backgroud. It was extremely readable, such that I finished it in two days. My only complaint is that although Sacks includes a postscript to most of the chapters to explain further studies or new discoveries that occurred after he first met these patients, there is often no resolution to these stories.

This is understandable, considering that many of the patients' disorders are unusual and may not have any resolution, but I still found it a little frustrating. I do, however, want to do more reading on this subject and look foward to reading Sacks' book titled Awakening. Sacks chose the title of the book from the case study of one of his patients which he names "Dr.

P" that has visual agnosia, a neurological condition that leaves him unable to recognize even familiar faces and objects. View all 3 comments. Dec 23, Barbara rated it liked it. Oliver Sacks was a physician, author, and professor of neurology who published several books about individuals with neurological problems. In this book Dr. Sacks discusses patients whose brain malfunctions cause a variety of 'maladies' including: a musician who lost the ability to see faces or recognize familiar objects; a former sailor who believed the year was permanently ; a man who thought his leg belonged to someone else; and other unusual afflictions.

To provide a feel for the book Dr. To provide a feel for the book I'll just give a capsule description of what I think are the most interesting cases. P was a talented musician and music teacher whose problems began when he lost the ability to see people's faces - though he could recognize them by their voices and movements. The problem worsened to the point where Dr. P mistakenly thought inanimate objects - like fire hydrants, parking meters, and furniture knobs - were humans.

In time Dr.


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P could no longer identify everybody objects. For example, he thought his shoe was his foot and vice versa. Though Dr. P was not diagnosed, physicians speculate that he had a brain tumor or brain damage that caused 'agnosia' - "the loss of ability to recognize objects, persons, sounds, shapes, or smells. P mistook his wife for a hatrack, took hold of her head Luckily, Dr. P retained the ability to play and teach music, and was able to continue with his fulfilling career. Sacks saw Jimmie G - a year-old man who left the Navy in after serving for more than two decades.

Jimmie seemed confused about his current situation but was able to describe his school days and his experiences during and after WWII - which he talked about in the present tense. Sacks learned that - in Jimmie's mind - the year was perpetually and he was years-old. Jimmie couldn't recall anything that post-dated and was unable to form ANY new memories. In fact, if Dr. Sacks walked out of the room and returned, Jimmie thought they were meeting for the first time.

When shown a mirror, Jimmie was shocked at his 'old' appearance, and - though his brother was long-married with grandchildren - thought his sibling was a single man in accounting school. Apparently Jimmie was competent until he left the Navy, but by was totally disoriented - probably from severe alcohol abuse. It was determined that Jimmie suffered from amnesia due to 'Korsakov's Syndrome' - "an amnestic disorder usually associated with prolonged ingestion of alcohol. When health problems required the removal of her gall bladder, Christina was treated with prophylactic antibiotics prior to the operation.

This was a common precaution, not expected to have any deleterious effects. Shortly before the surgery Christina had a dream in which she lost sensation in her hands and feet. Christina couldn't feel her arms, hands, legs, feet, etc. She couldn't walk, was unable to pick things up, and so on. Christina felt like her body was 'dead, not real, not hers. As a result, Christina lost her sense of 'proprioception' - "the ability to sense the relative positions of body parts without looking at them or thinking about it.

Eventually, Christina learned to use her other senses - especially vision - to compensate for her loss of propioception. Christina had to consciously monitor and regulate every motion, making her movements difficult and clumsy. Nevertheless, Christina persevered and tried to live as normal a life as possible.

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Sacks was called in to see a man who had been admitted to the hospital because of a problem with his leg. After falling asleep in the hospital, the patient woke up to find 'someone's leg in the bed' The man was horrified, and concluded that a nurse had perpetrated a bizarre joke. The patient threw the leg out of bed, but he went with it While Dr.

Sacks was in the room, the patient began punching and tearing at his left leg. Sacks advised the man to stop, as he was injuring his own limb, but the patient refused to accept this. The man apparently had hemiplegia - "paralysis on one side of the body" Sacks tells the story of a sailor who accidently cut off his right index finger, but couldn't dislodge the notion that the digit was still sticking out of his hand.

For the next 40 years, the sailor was wary of bringing his damaged hand near his face - to eat or scratch his nose - because the finger might poke his eye out. The sailor knew this couldn't really happen, but was unable to make the feeling go away. The sailor was finally 'cured' when he lost sensation in ALL of his fingers due to diabetic neuropathy nerve damage. The phantom finger 'disappeared' with the rest of his digits. Dunston, a year-old man with Parkinson's disease, tilted to the side when walking - to the point he was in danger of falling over.

However Mr. Dunston was unaware of the slant, and refused to believe he wasn't upright Sacks filmed him in motion. Dunston, who had been a carpenter, attributed the problem to the loss of his inner 'spirit level' an instrument used to determine whether a surface is perfectly horizontal or vertical. Dunston, being a clever fellow, rigged up a 'level' that could be attached to his eyeglasses - called 'spirit spectacles' - which he could use to correct his posture. The spirit spectacles became very popular with patients afflicted with Parkinson's disease.

S - a woman in her sixties - lost the ability to see anything on the left side. If Mrs. S's dessert was on the left side of her tray, she couldn't see it; in fact Mrs. S couldn't even see the food on the left side of her plate. This 'left blindness' extended to everything, so that Mrs. To compensate, Mrs. S got a rotating wheelchair and swiveled in a circle until things came into view - a crafty solution to some of her problems.

Natasha realized this was 'inappropriate', and - surmising she was physically ill - consulted a doctor. Natasha reported that, at age twenty, she had contracted 'Cupid's Disease' syphilis - which was treated, but apparently not eradicated. The bacteria were stimulating her cerebral cortex and affecting her behavior.

Man Who Mistook His Wife for a Hat Response

Natasha didn't want to get end-stage syphilis, but didn't want to be cured either So doctors gave Natasha penicillin to kill the microbes, but did nothing to repair her cerebral cortex - allowing the elderly woman to remain playful. At 90 years old, why not. O'C - an year-old Irishwoman living in an old age home in NY - was a little deaf but otherwise in good health. One night Mrs. O'C dreamed of her childhood in Ireland, complete with a woman singing Irish songs. When Mrs. O'C awoke, she still heard the Irish songs - very loud - and went to turn off the radio broadcasting the music. But there was no radio.

O'C then thought her dental fillings were picking up a broadcast, but this wasn't the case either. Finally, Mrs. O'C concluded something was wrong with her ears - and consulted a doctor. O'C was eventually sent to a neurologist - Dr. Sacks - but had trouble hearing him through the music. Sacks determined that the songs were neurological, probably due to a stroke that caused seizures in Mrs.

O'C's temporal lobe a part of the brain that processes music. As Mrs. O'C recovered, the music faded away. One night Stephen dreamed he was a dog, and woke up with a greatly heightened sense of smell. Stephen was able to distinguish all kinds of things by their 'aroma' including: friends, patients, streets, stores, sexual activity, foods, and so on. Unfortunately, unpleasant odors were stronger as well. After three weeks the enhanced sense of smell disappeared, and Stephen returned to normal. Years later, Dr. Sacks revealed that HE was Stephen D.

To modern ears, some of the language used in this section is very disturbing. Talking about people who are mentally challenged, Dr. Sacks uses terms like: simple, simpleton, retardate, mental cripple, idiot, moron, and dullard. Granted, these essays were written before such terms became 'forbidden. They had an IQ under 60, and were variously diagnosed as autistic, psychotic, or severely retarded.

As happens with some autistic people, the twins were 'idiot savants' - "mentally handicapped persons who display brilliance in a specific area, especially involving memory. The twins were also able to recall and repeat a long string of numbers over digits In fact, Dr. Sacks - wanting to join the game - got a 'cheat book' of prime numbers.

Ha ha ha Dr. Sacks waxes poetic about the twins, saying: "The twins, though morons, hear the world's symphony, but hear it entirely in the form of numbers. This was when Dr. Sacks met the patient. Then the BBC popular magazine, The Listener , invited him to compose something about the L-dopa trials that would be appropriate for their lay audience. Yes, I felt, yes, there are real people out there, who are imaginative and curious and want to know more.

They may not be neurologists, but, by God, they are real. The result was Awakenings , a collection of patient narratives that, with their overt surrender to the existential drama of each case, broke all the rules of conventional case history writing. Sacks opened each narrative by painting a word picture of the patient as a young person, before succumbing to encephalitis. The reader was then asked to bear witness to the tragedy of the illness, with all of its lost life and potential. The style of these cases, even more than that of Luria, was frankly novelistic.

Sacks followed observations of one previously paralyzed patient, Hester Y. Completely motionless and submerged for over twenty years, she had surfaced and shot into the air like a cork released from great depth; she had exploded with a vengeance from the shackles which held her.

Storytelling Lessons from Oliver Sacks: The World’s Most Revered Scientific Author

I thought of prisoners released from gaol; I thought of children released from school; I thought of spring awakenings after winter sleeps; I thought of Sleeping Beauty; and I also thought, with some foreboding, of catatonics, suddenly frenzied. All this, taken together, was much more than simply a revolt against the conventions of the narrowly written neurologic case history as a genre. On the contrary, said Sacks, the stories of brain-disordered people were fascinating and full of lessons for ordinary people.

Sacks wanted the public, through his narratives, to experience wonder at the exotic natives who inhabit the baroque world of brain disorder, but that is not all he wanted. Can one gaze in wonder at the strangeness of another person and, at the same time, experience human fellow feeling for that person? People would [once] crowd to see the inhabitants of Bedlam on Sunday. In our post-colonialist world, that is what has happened to all branches of anthropology. Why should this one be any different?


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An historical story needs still to be pieced together about how and why they were able to emerge as authors in their own right. What is clear at this point is that the goals of these patient-authored memoirs partially overlap with, but are not identical to, the goals of the popular narratives written by such doctor-authors as Sacks. Some of the books published in recent years have an elegiac tone; they function as poignant, courageous last testaments from people who discover that sharing their story, sharing their experience, is the sole remaining meaningful act they can perform.

Henderson recorded his increasingly disjointed thoughts onto a tape that was then edited by family members. Other books have a more activist sensibility. Thus, in her book Thinking in Pictures , a woman with high-functioning autism, Temple Grandin, pointed to ways in which her highly visual, rational, and concrete form of thinking enables her to do things— design more humane mechanisms for handling livestock—that so-called normal people cannot.

Comparing herself with Mr. Spock of Star Trek and her mind with a VCR player and TelePrompTer, she insists that, in spite of the suffering her disorder has caused her, she would not give it up if she could, because of the good things it enabled her to achieve. When I tic, I am usually not the problem. You are. One website www. In this context, it does a variety of kinds of cultural work. Some of this work is political and activist.

People who are different, it says, are not necessarily disabled or worse than the rest. Public policy should focus less on curing these people and more on making space for them to be who they are. A reformist message is also found in some of this literature: The doctor-patient relationship is dehumanizing, it says; doctors must learn to see their patients, including their brain-damaged patients, as whole people with stories of their own.

Still other parts of this literature see philosophical, even metaphysical import in narratives about the inner world of brain disorder: The message here is that the diverse experiences of the brain disordered offer us all a series of windows into the material, contingent, and constructed nature of human identity. Is any of this literature about the inner world of brain disorder of value to brain science? When J. Throughout his stroke onset and recovery, he carefully recorded introspective observations of his experience. He then organized them with the aim of drawing attention, above all, to some overlooked psychological effects of brain stem injuries, especially on sleep and dreaming.

His observations were published in Consciousness and Cognition in ; a slightly more popular version of his article appeared in Cerebrum in At the same time, as a genre, rare works like that of Hobson—brain scientists investigating the working of their own minds for science—sits uneasily with the memoirs, novels, and clinical tales I have reviewed in this article. Sometimes it is almost as if Hobson, as a clinician-researcher, is writing about someone other than himself. For all its many aims, it is concerned with the particular, the emotional, the value-laden, the meaningful, and the relational aspects of human experience.

At its best, therefore, this literature functions to remind us that being a human being—a human brain—is still a more complex and richer thing than can be contained in the spare and reductionistic vocabulary and frameworks of our sciences. Perhaps, in the end, that is the most important message it has to offer neuroscience.

Neuroaesthetics is a new and rapidly expanding field of research that is aimed at the intersection of psychological aesthetics, biological mechanisms, and human evolution. The silent, often subconscious conversation that is taking place inside us is one of the most vital communications we will ever find ourselves engaged in.

Our authors provide the latest research on what happens to the brain when you try to handle more than one task at a time. Do toys and games improve thinking or IQ, or do they just make a child better at playing the games? Sign up for monthly email updates on neuroscience discoveries, Cerebrum articles, and upcoming events. This website uses cookies to improve your experience while you navigate through the website. Out of these cookies, the cookies that are categorized as necessary are stored on your browser as they are essential for the working of basic functionalities of the website.

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